The Screaming Tunnel - 
According to local legend, The Screaming Tunnel to the west of Niagara Falls is home to the ghost of a young woman. There are many different stories about how she died but the two constant elements are that she died screaming and in flames. In one tale she ran into the tunnel after escaping a burning building with her clothes still on fire causing her to burn to death. In another story she was set alight by her estranged father who was enraged when he lost custody of his children. Another tragic tale claims that she was raped to death inside the tunnel and then her body was burned to prevent any evidence.
Many have reported hearing the girl’s dying screams when they have wandered into the tunnel at night. She is often provoked by fire and lighting a match inside the tunnel will cause her to scream and a gust of wind will brow through the tunnel, extinguishing the match. 

The Screaming Tunnel - 

According to local legend, The Screaming Tunnel to the west of Niagara Falls is home to the ghost of a young woman. There are many different stories about how she died but the two constant elements are that she died screaming and in flames. In one tale she ran into the tunnel after escaping a burning building with her clothes still on fire causing her to burn to death. In another story she was set alight by her estranged father who was enraged when he lost custody of his children. Another tragic tale claims that she was raped to death inside the tunnel and then her body was burned to prevent any evidence.

Many have reported hearing the girl’s dying screams when they have wandered into the tunnel at night. She is often provoked by fire and lighting a match inside the tunnel will cause her to scream and a gust of wind will brow through the tunnel, extinguishing the match. 

Housekeeping:

Just an announcement that Yokai (Japanese monsters) now have their own tag on the tags page: 

http://they-hide-in-the-dark.tumblr.com/tagged/Japanese-Monster

Funayūrei - 
Funayūrei  are Japanese vengeful ghosts that are similar to Onryō. They are spirits of the sea and ghosts of those who died in shipwrecks. Unlike an onryō they are not seeking vengeance against a certain person, they are simply angry and wish to make any many people join them in the afterlife as possible. They can take various forms but they are most often seen as apparitions floating above the water’s surface. They can also take the form of black ships or balls of fire. Funayūrei  are more likely to appear or cause problems on nights of foul weather, usually rainy, stormy or foggy nights and they have a preference for appearing on the full moon. They are also not limited to the sea as they can live in lakes, rivers and swamps. 
The Funayūrei have an array of methods to make boats sink. Their most common method is to use magical ladles to fill boats with water. They will also attempt to run ships off cliffs, make them capsize or strand them on reefs by creating fake lights to make sailors misjudge the location of the land. They can also cause compasses to malfunction and convince crew members to hang themselves. 
A slightly modern example of believed Funayūrei came in the aftermath of the sinking of the Tōya Maru in 1954. When the  Tōya Maru ferry sank between the islands of Hokkaido and Honshu 1,153 people died. After the accident ferries started reported having difficulties crossing the waters in the area and many found deep scratches and claw marks on their ship propellers. This started the theory that those who died on the Tōya Maru returned as Funayūrei  to sink more ships. The spirits themselves have been seen both on water and land. It is said that at midnight in Hokkaido a woman with soaking wet hair and clothing hails a taxi cab and disappears the moment she reaches her destination. Also in 1969 near Honshu a local university yacht club ended up shipwrecked after they saw a white female figure on the water and heard a voice saying "please give me a Hishaku."
Funayūrei  cannot be removed or laid to rest but there are many ways to avoid or repel them. Throwing different objects into the water is the most common way to scare them off. The most commonly used objects are: rice balls, a ladle that has the bottom missing, flowers, incense and washed rice. When you meet a Funayūrei  stopping your ship and staring at it is supposed to put it off attacking you, or you could light a match and throw it at the ghost. 

Funayūrei - 

Funayūrei  are Japanese vengeful ghosts that are similar to Onryō. They are spirits of the sea and ghosts of those who died in shipwrecks. Unlike an onryō they are not seeking vengeance against a certain person, they are simply angry and wish to make any many people join them in the afterlife as possible. They can take various forms but they are most often seen as apparitions floating above the water’s surface. They can also take the form of black ships or balls of fire. Funayūrei  are more likely to appear or cause problems on nights of foul weather, usually rainy, stormy or foggy nights and they have a preference for appearing on the full moon. They are also not limited to the sea as they can live in lakes, rivers and swamps. 

The Funayūrei have an array of methods to make boats sink. Their most common method is to use magical ladles to fill boats with water. They will also attempt to run ships off cliffs, make them capsize or strand them on reefs by creating fake lights to make sailors misjudge the location of the land. They can also cause compasses to malfunction and convince crew members to hang themselves. 

A slightly modern example of believed Funayūrei came in the aftermath of the sinking of the Tōya Maru in 1954. When the  Tōya Maru ferry sank between the islands of Hokkaido and Honshu 1,153 people died. After the accident ferries started reported having difficulties crossing the waters in the area and many found deep scratches and claw marks on their ship propellers. This started the theory that those who died on the Tōya Maru returned as Funayūrei  to sink more ships. The spirits themselves have been seen both on water and land. It is said that at midnight in Hokkaido a woman with soaking wet hair and clothing hails a taxi cab and disappears the moment she reaches her destination. Also in 1969 near Honshu a local university yacht club ended up shipwrecked after they saw a white female figure on the water and heard a voice saying "please give me a Hishaku."

Funayūrei  cannot be removed or laid to rest but there are many ways to avoid or repel them. Throwing different objects into the water is the most common way to scare them off. The most commonly used objects are: rice balls, a ladle that has the bottom missing, flowers, incense and washed rice. When you meet a Funayūrei  stopping your ship and staring at it is supposed to put it off attacking you, or you could light a match and throw it at the ghost. 

Changi Beach -
Listed as possibly the most haunted place in Asia, Changi beach has a grisly history. During WWII when Singapore was held by the Japanese the beach was one of the main locations used as an execution ground by Japanese soldiers. Chinese POWs and civilians were tortured, pushed into the sea, shot, beheaded and impaled on the beach and the area around it. The Sook Ching massacre was the most prominent event to take place on this beach. On the 20th of February 1942 Japanese soldiers gathered civilians and POWs, who they suspected to be plotting anti-Japanese movements, lined them up and shot them. Some where beheaded with samurai swords. Thousands of Chinese died on on Chagi Beach by the end of WWII. 
There is a story about the families of the executed seeking vengeance against the Japanese soldiers occupying Singapore. The wives, mothers and children plotted to blow up the Changi point, while the Japanese officers drove across it on their bicycles. They gathered and planted dynamite but they were discovered. All of the conspirators were lined up on the point and beheaded with swords. It is said that all of them cursed the point with their dying breath. Today people who drive over the point on bicycles have found themselves suddenly loosing control of their bike or feeling hands at their throat, strangling them as they ride. 
Ghostly happenings on this beach are very common and happen on a regular basis. Visitors to the beach head heard strange cries and screams rattling through the air. Phantom heads and dead bodies appear washed up on the beach only to disappear moments later. The sand sometimes appears blood stained. Headless bodies of Chinese prisoners and civilians have been seen wandering the beach at night. The most chilling sights are the reenactments of executions carried out by apparitions of both Chinese prisoners and Japanese soldiers, which leave ghostly blood stains on the sand when they disappear. 

Changi Beach -

Listed as possibly the most haunted place in Asia, Changi beach has a grisly history. During WWII when Singapore was held by the Japanese the beach was one of the main locations used as an execution ground by Japanese soldiers. Chinese POWs and civilians were tortured, pushed into the sea, shot, beheaded and impaled on the beach and the area around it. The Sook Ching massacre was the most prominent event to take place on this beach. On the 20th of February 1942 Japanese soldiers gathered civilians and POWs, who they suspected to be plotting anti-Japanese movements, lined them up and shot them. Some where beheaded with samurai swords. Thousands of Chinese died on on Chagi Beach by the end of WWII. 

There is a story about the families of the executed seeking vengeance against the Japanese soldiers occupying Singapore. The wives, mothers and children plotted to blow up the Changi point, while the Japanese officers drove across it on their bicycles. They gathered and planted dynamite but they were discovered. All of the conspirators were lined up on the point and beheaded with swords. It is said that all of them cursed the point with their dying breath. Today people who drive over the point on bicycles have found themselves suddenly loosing control of their bike or feeling hands at their throat, strangling them as they ride. 

Ghostly happenings on this beach are very common and happen on a regular basis. Visitors to the beach head heard strange cries and screams rattling through the air. Phantom heads and dead bodies appear washed up on the beach only to disappear moments later. The sand sometimes appears blood stained. Headless bodies of Chinese prisoners and civilians have been seen wandering the beach at night. The most chilling sights are the reenactments of executions carried out by apparitions of both Chinese prisoners and Japanese soldiers, which leave ghostly blood stains on the sand when they disappear

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Onryō  - 
An Onryō  is a type of Yūrei, which is another name for a Japanese ghost. Onryōs are vengeful spirits that have returned from purgatory to seek revenge against those who have wronged them in some way. All of them have the same striking look and they are almost always female. They have long black hair, pale skin, limp hands that hang by their sides and they are usually missing their legs and/or feet. They are always dressed in white clothing and are sometimes accompanied by floating flames, like will o’ the wisps. 
Onryōs are extremely malevolent and bloodthirsty spirits. They have a set goal and will usually only harm those who have wronged them, but it has been known for powerful and angry Onryōs to linger and continue hurting people even after they have achieved getting revenge. In Japanese folklore there have been many examples of Onryō  vengeance. A perfect example of this is the story of a samurai who promised his dying wife that he would never remarry. He broke that promise after she died so she returned as a vengeful spirit and beheaded his new wife. In another story a woman dies of heartbreak and curses her most prized and beautiful kimono. She then returns from the grave to kill anyone who wears it. They have also been known to let the target of their vengeance live but then set out to destroy their lives. 
The easiest way to get rid of an Onryō  is to let it do whatever it wants. Once it has its revenge it will rest in peace and cause no further damage. You can also help the ghost by slaying its killer or giving its body a proper burial if that hasn’t been preformed. That isn’t the case for very angry spirits and even normal ones kill people so to forcefully remove them you need a Buddhist priest to preform a special service that is saved for those who died unfortunate deaths. This is similar to an exorcism. Another method is to write down holy Shinto writings, that contain the name of a Kami, on a piece of paper and place it on the ghost’s forehead. You can also prevent an Onryō  from entering a house by sticking these papers on doors. 

Onryō  - 

An Onryō  is a type of Yūrei, which is another name for a Japanese ghost. Onryōs are vengeful spirits that have returned from purgatory to seek revenge against those who have wronged them in some way. All of them have the same striking look and they are almost always female. They have long black hair, pale skin, limp hands that hang by their sides and they are usually missing their legs and/or feet. They are always dressed in white clothing and are sometimes accompanied by floating flames, like will o’ the wisps. 

Onryōs are extremely malevolent and bloodthirsty spirits. They have a set goal and will usually only harm those who have wronged them, but it has been known for powerful and angry Onryōs to linger and continue hurting people even after they have achieved getting revenge. In Japanese folklore there have been many examples of Onryō  vengeance. A perfect example of this is the story of a samurai who promised his dying wife that he would never remarry. He broke that promise after she died so she returned as a vengeful spirit and beheaded his new wife. In another story a woman dies of heartbreak and curses her most prized and beautiful kimono. She then returns from the grave to kill anyone who wears it. They have also been known to let the target of their vengeance live but then set out to destroy their lives. 

The easiest way to get rid of an Onryō  is to let it do whatever it wants. Once it has its revenge it will rest in peace and cause no further damage. You can also help the ghost by slaying its killer or giving its body a proper burial if that hasn’t been preformed. That isn’t the case for very angry spirits and even normal ones kill people so to forcefully remove them you need a Buddhist priest to preform a special service that is saved for those who died unfortunate deaths. This is similar to an exorcism. Another method is to write down holy Shinto writings, that contain the name of a Kami, on a piece of paper and place it on the ghost’s forehead. You can also prevent an Onryō  from entering a house by sticking these papers on doors. 

The Faceless Woman - 
A ghost that appears in various haunting legends and folklore around the world, the faceless woman is beautiful and usually seen first from behind. She is usually mistaken for a living woman but terrifies people when she turns around and they discover that she has no face. 
She is very common in Japanese urban legends but her story has been told for many years. The earliest known sighting was in 1904 when a merchant noticed a woman crying in the street. She was beautiful and dressed in a way that he could tell that she came from a well-to-do family. He stopped to help her but she continued to weep and kept her face covered by her long sleeve. The merchant continued to try to offer her help. Suddenly she turned her head and he saw that she had no face. He screamed and ran away. Without looking back he kept running until he bumped into a soba seller. When the soba seller asked the merchant what was wrong the merchant told him that he couldn’t say because he would never believe him. The soba man answered him by saying, “Did she show you something like this?” and when the man looked up he saw that the soba man was faceless as well. 
The faceless woman hasn’t only sighted in Japan. A faceless ghost haunted a Drive-in in Honolulu, Hawaii. In 1959 young girl was using the restroom at the drive-in to touch up her makeup when she saw a faceless woman standing behind her in the mirror. The woman was not only missing her face but her legs were missing as well. The girl promptly screamed and fainted. Sightings of the faceless woman have been reported in the area ever since. Even when the drive-in was torn down to make way for new houses, the faceless and legless woman was often sighted wandering the new streets. She even appeared at a wedding reception, in local shops and the nearby college. 

The Faceless Woman - 

A ghost that appears in various haunting legends and folklore around the world, the faceless woman is beautiful and usually seen first from behind. She is usually mistaken for a living woman but terrifies people when she turns around and they discover that she has no face. 

She is very common in Japanese urban legends but her story has been told for many years. The earliest known sighting was in 1904 when a merchant noticed a woman crying in the street. She was beautiful and dressed in a way that he could tell that she came from a well-to-do family. He stopped to help her but she continued to weep and kept her face covered by her long sleeve. The merchant continued to try to offer her help. Suddenly she turned her head and he saw that she had no face. He screamed and ran away. Without looking back he kept running until he bumped into a soba seller. When the soba seller asked the merchant what was wrong the merchant told him that he couldn’t say because he would never believe him. The soba man answered him by saying, “Did she show you something like this?” and when the man looked up he saw that the soba man was faceless as well. 

The faceless woman hasn’t only sighted in Japan. A faceless ghost haunted a Drive-in in Honolulu, Hawaii. In 1959 young girl was using the restroom at the drive-in to touch up her makeup when she saw a faceless woman standing behind her in the mirror. The woman was not only missing her face but her legs were missing as well. The girl promptly screamed and fainted. Sightings of the faceless woman have been reported in the area ever since. Even when the drive-in was torn down to make way for new houses, the faceless and legless woman was often sighted wandering the new streets. She even appeared at a wedding reception, in local shops and the nearby college. 

The Cottage City Poltergeist / The True Story Behind The Exorcist - 
The story of the possession of Roland Doe in the 1940s is believed to be the real life inspiration behind the film The Exorcist. The boy’s real name was never disclosed by the church in order to protect him after the events of the exorcism. The story was collected for the diaries of a bishop and the testimony of Father Walter Halloran who was one of the surviving eye witnesses to the exorcism and strange events surrounding it. 
When Roland’s aunt died when he was 13 he attempted to contact her using a oujia board. After that strange events started happening around the house. Squeaky and marching footsteps would be heard about the house, furniture would move of its own accord, a vase flew across the room, images of Jesus rattled as though they were being punched on the other side of the wall and containers of holy water would mysteriously smash if placed near Roland. His frightened family turned to Rev. Luther Miles Schulze for help. He had Roland examined by both medical and psychological doctors who could not find anything that would cause the strange occurrences. Schulze arranged for the boy to stay with him on the 17th of February. During the night the priest witnessed several strange events. He was awoken by vibrating sounds coming from the bed and scratching sounds behind the walls. An armchair the boy was sitting on raised into the air and tipped over, and blankets flew around the room hitting people in the face. After that night Schulze concluded that an exorcism should be preformed on Roland. 
Roland was taken to Georgetown University Hospital for his first exorcism but it had to be stopped after he inflicted a wound on one of the priests that required stitches. He was then sent home, but after strange welts started appearing on the boy’s body his parents sent for the priests again. It is then they discovered that Roland had developed an aversion to anything sacred and holy, he was causing the bed to shake, objects would fly around the room and he had started speaking in a strange and guttural voice. 
The priests gained permission to preform a second exorcism on the boy and he was taken to hospital again. During the exorcism words such as “evil” and “hell”, along with other marks started appearing on the boy’s body. He broke one of the attending priest’s noses and it wasnt until they preformed the exorcism rights 30 times, over a period of several weeks, that Roland was finally considered cured. Many witnesses in the hospital claim to have heard a loud noise the moment Roland was finally free from his demonic possession. 

The Cottage City Poltergeist / The True Story Behind The Exorcist - 

The story of the possession of Roland Doe in the 1940s is believed to be the real life inspiration behind the film The Exorcist. The boy’s real name was never disclosed by the church in order to protect him after the events of the exorcism. The story was collected for the diaries of a bishop and the testimony of Father Walter Halloran who was one of the surviving eye witnesses to the exorcism and strange events surrounding it. 

When Roland’s aunt died when he was 13 he attempted to contact her using a oujia board. After that strange events started happening around the house. Squeaky and marching footsteps would be heard about the house, furniture would move of its own accord, a vase flew across the room, images of Jesus rattled as though they were being punched on the other side of the wall and containers of holy water would mysteriously smash if placed near Roland. His frightened family turned to Rev. Luther Miles Schulze for help. He had Roland examined by both medical and psychological doctors who could not find anything that would cause the strange occurrences. Schulze arranged for the boy to stay with him on the 17th of February. During the night the priest witnessed several strange events. He was awoken by vibrating sounds coming from the bed and scratching sounds behind the walls. An armchair the boy was sitting on raised into the air and tipped over, and blankets flew around the room hitting people in the face. After that night Schulze concluded that an exorcism should be preformed on Roland. 

Roland was taken to Georgetown University Hospital for his first exorcism but it had to be stopped after he inflicted a wound on one of the priests that required stitches. He was then sent home, but after strange welts started appearing on the boy’s body his parents sent for the priests again. It is then they discovered that Roland had developed an aversion to anything sacred and holy, he was causing the bed to shake, objects would fly around the room and he had started speaking in a strange and guttural voice. 

The priests gained permission to preform a second exorcism on the boy and he was taken to hospital again. During the exorcism words such as “evil” and “hell”, along with other marks started appearing on the boy’s body. He broke one of the attending priest’s noses and it wasnt until they preformed the exorcism rights 30 times, over a period of several weeks, that Roland was finally considered cured. Many witnesses in the hospital claim to have heard a loud noise the moment Roland was finally free from his demonic possession. 

Ekimmu/Edimmu -
An Edimmu is a spirit or demon from Sumerian folklore that has been denied entrance to the underworld and is doomed to wander the earth for eternity. When a person dies a violent or unpleasant death and their body is not given a proper burial their spirit will return as an edimmu. An edimmu is also created if a person dies without any family to care about them or ensure a proper burial is preformed. 
Edimmus are extremely malevolent spirits. They will attach themselves to any living human being and possess them. So much as looking at an improperly buried corpse or that of someone who has died a violent death can cause possession by an edimmu. Once it attaches itself to a living person an edimmu will kill their entire family and force them to carry other other criminal acts. They will also suck the life out of sleeping people, especially the young. 
They are extremely difficult to remove once they have attached themselves to a person. They have to be exorcised but sometimes they can be appeased by preforming the correct burial rights on them. 

Ekimmu/Edimmu -

An Edimmu is a spirit or demon from Sumerian folklore that has been denied entrance to the underworld and is doomed to wander the earth for eternity. When a person dies a violent or unpleasant death and their body is not given a proper burial their spirit will return as an edimmu. An edimmu is also created if a person dies without any family to care about them or ensure a proper burial is preformed. 

Edimmus are extremely malevolent spirits. They will attach themselves to any living human being and possess them. So much as looking at an improperly buried corpse or that of someone who has died a violent death can cause possession by an edimmu. Once it attaches itself to a living person an edimmu will kill their entire family and force them to carry other other criminal acts. They will also suck the life out of sleeping people, especially the young. 

They are extremely difficult to remove once they have attached themselves to a person. They have to be exorcised but sometimes they can be appeased by preforming the correct burial rights on them.